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How to Download and Use Openwall Wordlists Collection for Password Cracking




Password cracking is a common technique used by hackers, security researchers, and forensic analysts to recover or guess passwords from encrypted or hashed data. Password cracking can be used for malicious purposes, such as breaking into someone's account or network, or for legitimate purposes, such as testing the strength of your own passwords or recovering lost passwords.




openwall wordlists collection full version download



However, password cracking is not an easy task, as it requires a lot of computing power and time. One way to speed up the process is to use a wordlist, which is a file containing a large number of possible passwords. A wordlist can help you narrow down the search space and increase the chances of finding the correct password.


One of the most popular and comprehensive wordlists available is the openwall wordlists collection, which is a result of processing many hundreds of public domain wordlist files from multiple sources and in a variety of file formats. The collection includes wordlists for 20+ human languages and lists of common passwords. There is also a huge list of all the common passwords and words from all the languages with word mangling rules applied and any duplicates purged. This wordlist is provided as a single text file with over 40 million entries.


In this article, we will show you how to download and use openwall wordlists collection for password cracking. We will also give you some tips and best practices for using wordlists effectively and safely.


Introduction




What is openwall wordlists collection and why is it useful?




Openwall wordlists collection is a project by Openwall, which is a company that provides security software and services for open computing environments. Openwall is also known for developing John the Ripper, which is one of the most popular password crackers in existence.


According to the official website, openwall wordlists collection is a result of processing many hundreds of public domain wordlist files from multiple sources and in a variety of file formats. The wordlists are intended primarily for use with password crackers such as John the Ripper and with third-party password recovery utilities. The collection includes wordlists for 20+ human languages and lists of common passwords. There is also a huge list of all the common passwords and words from all the languages with word mangling rules applied and any duplicates purged. This wordlist is provided as a single text file with over 40 million entries.


What is password cracking and what are the main methods?




Password cracking is the process of using an application program to identify an unknown or forgotten password to a computer or network resource. It can also be used to help a threat actor obtain unauthorized access to resources. Password crackers use different methods to guess passwords, such as dictionary attack, brute-force attack, and hybrid attack. Wordlists are essential for password cracking, as they provide a set of possible passwords to try. The quality and size of the wordlist can affect the speed and success of the password cracking process.


How to download openwall wordlists collection full version




Requirements and costs




To download openwall wordlists collection full version, you will need a computer with enough disk space and internet connection. The full version of the collection is not free, but it is reasonably priced at $29.95 USD for personal or academic use, and $99.95 USD for commercial use. You can pay with PayPal or credit card, and you will receive a download link via email after your payment is confirmed.


Steps to download and extract the wordlist file




Once you have received the download link, follow these steps to download and extract the wordlist file:


  • Click on the link and save the file to your desired location. The file name is wordlists.full.tar.gz and its size is about 500 MB.



  • Open a terminal window and navigate to the directory where you saved the file.



  • Type tar xzvf wordlists.full.tar.gz to extract the contents of the file. This will create a folder named wordlists with several subfolders containing different wordlists.



  • You can now use any of the wordlists in your password cracking tools.



How to use openwall wordlists collection with password crackers




How to choose the right wordlist for your target




The openwall wordlists collection contains many different wordlists for various purposes and languages. Depending on your target, you may want to choose a specific wordlist that matches the characteristics of the password you are trying to crack. For example, if you know that the password is in English, you may want to use one of the English wordlists. If you know that the password is based on a common phrase or pattern, you may want to use one of the mangled or generated wordlists. If you are not sure about the password, you may want to use one of the comprehensive or combined wordlists that cover many possibilities.


How to use the wordlist with John the Ripper




John the Ripper is one of the most popular password crackers that can work with openwall wordlists collection. To use a wordlist with John the Ripper, follow these steps:


  • Open a terminal window and navigate to the directory where John the Ripper is installed.



  • Type john --wordlist=/path/to/wordlist --format=hash-type hash-file, where /path/to/wordlist is the location of the wordlist you want to use, hash-type is the type of hash you are cracking (e.g., md5, sha1, etc.), and hash-file is the file containing the hashes you want to crack.



  • Press Enter and wait for John to start cracking passwords using your chosen wordlist.



  • You can view the cracked passwords by typing john --show hash-file.



How to use the wordlist with other password recovery tools




Besides John the Ripper, there are many other password recovery tools that can work with openwall wordlists collection. Some examples are Hashcat, Cain & Abel, Ophcrack, L0phtCrack, etc. Each tool has its own syntax and options for using wordlists, so you will need to refer to their documentation or help files for specific instructions. However, the general idea is to provide the path to the wordlist file as an argument or option to the tool, and specify the hash type and the hash file as well. You can also use some tools to create your own custom wordlists from existing wordlists or other sources, such as Hashcat's --stdout option or Crunch.


Tips and best practices for using wordlists




How to optimize your wordlist for faster cracking




Using a wordlist can speed up the password cracking process, but it can also be slow and inefficient if the wordlist is too large or contains irrelevant words. To optimize your wordlist for faster cracking, you can follow these tips:


  • Sort your wordlist by frequency or popularity. This way, you can try the most common or likely passwords first and save time. You can use tools like Sort or Unique to sort and remove duplicates from your wordlist.



  • Filter your wordlist by length or character set. This way, you can eliminate words that are too short or too long, or that do not match the requirements of the password policy. You can use tools like Grep or Sed to filter your wordlist by patterns or expressions.



  • Mangle your wordlist by applying rules or transformations. This way, you can generate variations of words that may be used as passwords, such as adding numbers, symbols, case changes, etc. You can use tools like John the Ripper's --rules option or Hashcat's --rules-file option to mangle your wordlist.



How to avoid legal and ethical issues when using wordlists




Using wordlists for password cracking can be a powerful and useful technique, but it can also be illegal and unethical if done without proper authorization or consent. To avoid legal and ethical issues when using wordlists, you should follow these guidelines:


  • Do not use wordlists for malicious purposes, such as hacking into someone else's account or network, stealing data or money, or causing damage or harm.



  • Do not use wordlists for unauthorized purposes, such as cracking passwords that you do not own or have permission to access, or violating the terms of service or privacy policy of a website or service.



  • Do not use wordlists for personal gain, such as selling or sharing cracked passwords, exploiting vulnerabilities, or blackmailing victims.



  • Do use wordlists for legitimate purposes, such as testing the strength of your own passwords, recovering lost passwords, conducting security audits or research, or educating yourself or others.



  • Do use wordlists responsibly and ethically, such as respecting the rights and privacy of others, reporting any security issues or breaches to the owners or authorities, and deleting any sensitive data after use.



How to protect your own passwords from being cracked by wordlists




If you are concerned about your own passwords being cracked by wordlists, you should take some measures to make them more secure and resistant to password cracking attacks. Here are some tips on how to protect your own passwords from being cracked by wordlists:


  • Avoid using common or predictable passwords, such as names, dates, words, phrases, patterns, etc. These are likely to be included in any wordlist and easy to crack.



  • Avoid using the same password for multiple accounts or services. This way, even if one of your passwords is cracked by a wordlist, the rest of your accounts will remain safe.



  • Use long and complex passwords that contain a mix of uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, symbols, and spaces. These are harder to crack by wordlists and brute-force attacks.



  • Use a password manager to generate and store strong and unique passwords for each of your accounts. This way, you do not have to remember them or write them down.



  • Use two-factor authentication (2FA) or multi-factor authentication (MFA) whenever possible. This way, even if your password is cracked by a wordlist, you will still need another factor (such as a code sent to your phone or email) to access your account.



Conclusion




Summary of the main points




In this article, we have shown you how to download and use openwall wordlists collection for password cracking. We have also given you some tips and best practices for using wordlists effectively and safely. Here are the main points we have covered:


  • Openwall wordlists collection is a comprehensive and popular collection of wordlists for password cracking that includes wordlists for 20+ human languages and lists of common passwords.



  • Password cracking is the process of using an application program to identify an unknown or forgotten password to a computer or network resource. Password crackers use different methods to guess passwords, such as dictionary attack, brute-force attack, and hybrid attack.



  • To download openwall wordlists collection full version, you will need a computer with enough disk space and internet connection. The full version of the collection is not free, but it is reasonably priced at $29.95 USD for personal or academic use, and $99.95 USD for commercial use. You can pay with PayPal or credit card, and you will receive a download link via email after your payment is confirmed.



  • To use openwall wordlists collection with password crackers, you will need to choose the right wordlist for your target, and provide the path to the wordlist file as an argument or option to the tool. You can also use some tools to create your own custom wordlists from existing wordlists or other sources.



  • To optimize your wordlist for faster cracking, you can sort your wordlist by frequency or popularity, filter your wordlist by length or character set, and mangle your wordlist by applying rules or transformations.



  • To avoid legal and ethical issues when using wordlists, you should not use wordlists for malicious, unauthorized, or personal gain purposes. You should use wordlists for legitimate, authorized, or educational purposes. You should use wordlists responsibly and ethically, respecting the rights and privacy of others, reporting any security issues or breaches to the owners or authorities, and deleting any sensitive data after use.



  • To protect your own passwords from being cracked by wordlists, you should avoid using common or predictable passwords, avoid using the same password for multiple accounts or services, use long and complex passwords that contain a mix of uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, symbols, and spaces, use a password manager to generate and store strong and unique passwords for each of your accounts, and use two-factor authentication or multi-factor authentication whenever possible.



Call to action or recommendation




We hope that this article has helped you understand how to download and use openwall wordlists collection for password cracking. If you are interested in learning more about password cracking or security in general, we recommend that you check out the following resources:


  • The official website of Openwall, where you can find more information about openwall wordlists collection, John the Ripper, and other security software and services.



  • The official website of John the Ripper, where you can find more information about how to use John the Ripper for password cracking, including documentation, tutorials, examples, and FAQs.



  • The official website of Hashcat, where you can find more information about how to use Hashcat for password cracking, including documentation, tutorials, examples, and FAQs.



  • The official website of OWASP, where you can find more information about web application security, including guides, tools, projects, and events.



  • The official website of SANS Institute, where you can find more information about cybersecurity training, certification, research, and community.



Thank you for reading this article. If you have any questions or feedback, please feel free to leave a comment below. Happy password cracking!


FAQs




What is the difference between openwall wordlists collection full version and free version?




The free version of openwall wordlists collection is a subset of the full version that contains only some of the wordlists. The free version is available for download from the official website without any payment or registration. The full version of openwall wordlists collection contains all the wordlists in the collection and is available for purchase from the official website with a payment of $29.95 USD for personal or academic use, or $99.95 USD for commercial use.


How long does it take to crack a password with openwall wordlists collection?




The time it takes to crack a password with openwall wordlists collection depends on several factors, such as the length and complexity of the password, the type and speed of the password cracker, the size and quality of the wordlist, and the computing resources available. Generally speaking, the longer and more complex the password, the longer it will take to crack. The faster and more advanced the password cracker, the shorter it will take to crack. The larger and more comprehensive the wordlist, the higher the chance of cracking the password. The more computing power and memory available, the faster the cracking process will be. Therefore, it is hard to give an exact estimate of how long it will take to crack a password with openwall wordlists collection, as it may vary from case to case.


How can I create my own wordlist from scratch?




If you want to create your own wordlist from scratch, you will need to collect and process a large amount of data that contains potential passwords or words. You can use various sources of data, such as websites, books, articles, social media posts, forums, blogs, etc. You can also use tools like Scrapy or BeautifulSoup to scrape data from web pages. Once you have collected enough data, you will need to clean and format it into a text file that contains one word per line. You can use tools like Grep, Sed, Awk, or Perl to manipulate and filter your data. You can also use tools like Sort or Unique to sort and remove duplicates from your data. You can also use tools like John the Ripper's --rules option or Hashcat's --rules-file option to mangle your data and generate variations of words. Creating your own wordlist from scratch can be a time-consuming and tedious process, but it can also be rewarding and customized for your specific needs.


How can I update my wordlist with new passwords or words?




If you want to update your wordlist with new passwords or words, you will need to append them to your existing wordlist file. You can use tools like Cat or Echo to add new lines to your wordlist file. You can also use tools like Sort or Unique to sort and remove duplicates from your wordlist file. You can also use tools like John the Ripper's --rules option or Hashcat's --rules-file option to mangle your wordlist file and generate variations of words. Updating your wordlist with new passwords or words can help you keep up with the latest trends and patterns in password creation and usage.


How can I test the quality of my wordlist?




If you want to test the quality of your wordlist, you will need to compare it with a sample of real passwords or hashes that you want to crack. You can use tools like John the Ripper's --test option or Hashcat's --benchmark option to measure the speed and performance of your wordlist against a sample of hashes. You can also use tools like John the Ripper's --show option or Hashcat's --show option to display the cracked passwords from your wordlist against a sample of hashes. Testing the quality of your wordlist can help you evaluate its effectiveness and efficiency for password cracking. dcd2dc6462


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